asylum-art:

Textile art by Mister Finch

Self-taught artist Mr. Finch creates animals and other objects that seem to stem from Alice’s Wonderland. Inspired by the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch forms flowers, insects and birds that fascinate him with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour.

He then goes hunting for vintage textiles – velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron – and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. According to Mr. Finch, his figures are “storytelling creatures for people who are also a little lost, found and forgotten”.

deductionhunters:

theskeletonsareafterme:

zelamish:

wunderbrot:

the buugeng is a type of s-staff.
to the best of my knowledge, it is used to engage in geometric visual warfare

Accurate.

GEOMETRIC VISUAL WARFARE.

No but can you imagine how distracting and disconcerting it’d be to go up against someone with a weapon like that
You wouldn’t know where the fuck to look and you’d only figure out which part to focus on when it’s buried in your gut

deductionhunters:

theskeletonsareafterme:

zelamish:

wunderbrot:

the buugeng is a type of s-staff.

to the best of my knowledge, it is used to engage in geometric visual warfare

Accurate.

GEOMETRIC VISUAL WARFARE.

No but can you imagine how distracting and disconcerting it’d be to go up against someone with a weapon like that

You wouldn’t know where the fuck to look and you’d only figure out which part to focus on when it’s buried in your gut

seerofsarcasm:

ladyshinga:

theirwaywardangel:

haboku:

areyoutryingtospookme:

youhavebroughtthegiftoflove:

futuro-heroi:

Such an unexpected plot-twist.

oh my god wait what

best wedding photos ever

Omfg I wasn’t going to load the pictures but then I saw the comments so I did and it was SO WORTH IT

oh my god

guys, SEE ALL THE PICTURES IT’S WORTH IT

"There’s no fucking way i’m loading all these pictures" I said before I hit the comments. So I did. What an interesting wedding photo set (if this is even a real wedding).

palaceofsymbols:

Alphonse Mucha, Salammbô, 1896.
The fin de siècle in France is known retrospectively as la Belle Époque – the Beautiful Era, the time anticipating the 1900 Exposition Universelle, the time before the War. When we peer through the mists of imaginative history, the era is illuminated by a magical glow. It was always a lush twilight, Montmarte was flooded with geniuses and bohemians, the cafés lit by those charming globe-shaped lamps, the cuisine was haute and absinthe flowed from the fountains, the scent of Grasset’s flowers and the tinkling of Debussy and Satie wafted through the air, all the actresses were Sarah Bernhardt, all the can-can dancers were Toulouse-Lautrecs, all the men were Sem’s quipping dandies sporting green carnations to match their Pernod and all the wine-warm laughing ladies in the cabarets had hair made of twining Mucha whiplash lines, all their jewelry was Lalique, all the furniture was Majorelle and unfurled itself in organic floral curves, even all the posters pasted on the buildings were bright and beautiful Art Nouveau advertising the gay nightlife of the City of Light.
This was the same city Jean Lorrain called the Poisoned City. This beautiful era was also the reign of the Decadence, languidly awaiting the Apocalypse on the deathbed of history, disgusted and exhausted by all the crass gaiety, seeing in every woman a femme fatale and in every man a syphilitic Sodomite, and fleeing into dreams, drugs or the occult. We see the two faces of the fin de siècle meet at times, in Mucha for example, here taking the incense, flowers and peacock feathers of Symbolism’s favorite Flaubert heroine and rendering them in the bold-lined, glowing, graphic style that assured his fame as a master Art Nouveau confectioner.  

palaceofsymbols:

Alphonse Mucha, Salammbô, 1896.

The fin de siècle in France is known retrospectively as la Belle Époque – the Beautiful Era, the time anticipating the 1900 Exposition Universelle, the time before the War. When we peer through the mists of imaginative history, the era is illuminated by a magical glow. It was always a lush twilight, Montmarte was flooded with geniuses and bohemians, the cafés lit by those charming globe-shaped lamps, the cuisine was haute and absinthe flowed from the fountains, the scent of Grasset’s flowers and the tinkling of Debussy and Satie wafted through the air, all the actresses were Sarah Bernhardt, all the can-can dancers were Toulouse-Lautrecs, all the men were Sem’s quipping dandies sporting green carnations to match their Pernod and all the wine-warm laughing ladies in the cabarets had hair made of twining Mucha whiplash lines, all their jewelry was Lalique, all the furniture was Majorelle and unfurled itself in organic floral curves, even all the posters pasted on the buildings were bright and beautiful Art Nouveau advertising the gay nightlife of the City of Light.

This was the same city Jean Lorrain called the Poisoned City. This beautiful era was also the reign of the Decadence, languidly awaiting the Apocalypse on the deathbed of history, disgusted and exhausted by all the crass gaiety, seeing in every woman a femme fatale and in every man a syphilitic Sodomite, and fleeing into dreams, drugs or the occult. We see the two faces of the fin de siècle meet at times, in Mucha for example, here taking the incense, flowers and peacock feathers of Symbolism’s favorite Flaubert heroine and rendering them in the bold-lined, glowing, graphic style that assured his fame as a master Art Nouveau confectioner.  

the-indigo-dragonfly:

Tomoe Gozen  巴御前- onna bugeisha

Tomoe Gozen was a female samurai during the Genpei War of 1180–1185 CE. Though female warriors were not uncommon in Japan at the time, Tomoe is one of very few female samurai, highly trained and skilled in horseback riding, archery, sword fighting and she was also greatly skilled in the use of the naginata, which is a long staff with a curved blade at one end. Tomoe Gozen beheaded many enemies with naginata, because she didn’t believe in staying behind in battles, she was always at the fore front of any battle line.
She was a senior captain under general Minamoto no Yoshinaka, and either his attendant or consort as well, depending on the source. Her surname is not known, as Gozen is simply a title, somewhat like “Lady.”

The earliest written source regarding Tomoe Gozen is from the 14th century Japanese classic, The Tale of the Heike, which in turn is derived from oral tradition. This source describes her as almost supernaturally strong, very beautiful, and surpassing her male colleagues in skill and bravery.

The Heike Monogatari goes on to say that Tomoe was one of the last five of Yoshinaka’s warriors standing at the tail end of the Battle of Awazu, and that Yoshinaka, knowing that death was near, urged her to flee. Though reluctant, she rushed a Minamoto warrior named Onda no Hachirô Moroshige, cut his head off, and then fled for the eastern provinces.

Some have written that Tomoe in fact died in battle with her husband, while others assert that she survived and became a nun.

She is among the most popular and widely known female figures in Japanese history/legend, and appears as the lead in at least one kabuki play, Onna Shibaraku

The Most Beautiful Trees In The World

  1. Portland Japanese Garden, Portland, Oregon. Photo: Unknown
  2. Red maples trees path. Photo: Ildiko Neer
  3. Most beautiful wisteria tree in the world. Photo: Brian Young
  4. Yellow autumn in Central Park, New York. Photo: Christopher Schoenbohm
  5. Amazing Angel Oak Tree, Charlston, Photo by Mark Requidan.
  6. Cherry blossom tree path, Germany. Photo: Shoeven
  7. California in autumn. Photo: Mizzy Pacheco
  8. Jacaranda trees in bloom, South Africa. Photo: Falke
  9. Ponthus beech tree in Brocéliande forest, France. Photo: Christophe Kiciak
  10. Beautiful cherry blossom road. Photo: Unknown